A How to Guide…

"Do not seek praise, seek criticism." – Paul Arden

Month: April, 2009

Words of Wisdom

48_laws_of_power

Power is seductive. To define seductive we must first define seduce.
Seduce means:
 
1. to lead astray, as from duty, rectitude, or the like; corrupt.
 
2. to lead or draw away, as from principles, faith, or allegiance: He
was seduced by the prospect of gain.

 
The 48 laws of power are well written and useful. Read this book to
defend yourself from people who may be trying to manipulate you.

What Not To Do

Fail-owned-roadpaint-fail

Road Paint Fail 

Dont be lazy

Dont cover up your crap

Sliced Bread

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/seth_godin_on_sliced_bread.html

Add This To Your Lexicon

eleemosynary

 el-uh-MOS-uh-ner-ee, adjective:
1. Of or for charity; charitable; as, “an eleemosynary institution.”
2. Given in charity; having the nature of alms; as, “eleemosynary assistance.”
3. Supported by or dependent on charity; as, “the eleemosynary poor.”

The source of eleemosynary is Medieval Latin eleemosynarius, from Late Latineleemosyna, “alms,” from Greek eleemosyne, from eleemon, “pitiful,” from eleos, “pity.”

Constructive Capitalism

Therapy


And I Love Her by The Beatles

Fundamentals

Before you speak, listen.
Before you write, think.
Before you spend, earn.
Before you invest, investigate.
Before you criticize, wait.
Before you pray, forgive.
Before you quit, try.
Before you retire, save.
Before you die, give.

 – William A. Ward

A Web-Empowered Revolution In Teaching

When we think of the world’s teeming billions of humans, we tend to
think: overpopulation, poverty, disease, instability, environmental
destruction. They are the cause of most of the planet’s problems.

What if that were to change? What if the average human were able to
contribute more than consume? To add more than subtract? Think of the
world as if each person drives a balance sheet. On the negative side
are the resources they consume without replacing, on the positive side
are the contributions they make to the planet in the form of the
resources they produce, the lasting artifacts-of-value they build, and
the ideas and technologies that might create a better future for their
family, their community and for the planet as a whole. Our whole
future hangs on whether the sum of those balance sheets can turn
positive.

What might make that possible? One key reason for hope is that so far
we have barely scraped the surface of human potential. Throughout
history, the vast majority of humans have not been the people they
could have been.

Take this simple thought experiment. Pick your favorite scientist,
mathematician or cultural hero. Now imagine that instead of being born
when and where they were, they had instead been born with the same
in-built-but-unlocked abilities in a typical poverty-stricken village
in, say, the France of 1200 or the Ethiopia of 1980. Would they have
made the contribution they made? Of course not. They would never have
received the education and encouragement it took to achieve what they
did. Instead they would have simply lived out a life of poverty, with
perhaps an occasional yearning that there must be a better way.

Conversely, an unknown but vast number of those grinding out a living
today have the potential to be world-changers… if only we could find
a way of unlocking that potential.

Two ingredients might be enough to do that. Knowledge and inspiration.
If you learn of ideas that could transform your life, and you feel the
inspiration necessary to act on that knowledge, there’s a real chance
your life will indeed be transformed.

There are many scary things about today’s world. But one that is truly
thrilling is that the means of spreading both knowledge and
inspiration have never been greater. Five years ago, an amazing
teacher or professor with the ability to truly catalyze the lives of
his or her students could realistically hope to impact maybe 100
people each year. Today that same teacher can have their words spread
on video to millions of eager students. There are already numerous
examples of powerful talks that have spread virally to massive
Internet audiences.

Driving this unexpected phenomenon is the fact that the physical cost
of distributing a recorded talk or lecture anywhere in the world via
the internet has fallen effectively to zero. This has happened with
breathtaking speed and its implications are not yet widely understood.
But it is surely capable of transforming global education.

For one thing, the realization that today’s best teachers can become
global celebrities is going to boost the caliber of those who teach.
For the first time in many years it’s possible to imagine ambitious,
brilliant 18-year-olds putting ‘teacher’ at the top of their career
choice list. Indeed the very definition of “great teacher” will
expand, as numerous others outside the profession with the ability to
communicate important ideas find a new incentive to make that talent
available to the world. Additionally every existing teacher can
greatly amplify their own abilities by inviting into their classroom,
on video, the world’s greatest scientists, visionaries and tutors.
(Can a teacher inspire over video? Absolutely. We hear jaw-dropping
stories of this every day.)

Now think about this from the pupils’ perspective. In the past,
everyone’s success has depended on whether they were lucky enough to
have a great mentor or teacher in their neighborhood. The vast
majority have not been fortunate. But a young girl born in Africa
today will probably have access in 10 years’ time to a cell phone with
a high-resolution screen, a web connection, and more power than the
computer you own today. We can imagine her obtaining face-to-face
insight and encouragement from her choice of the world’s great
teachers. She will get a chance to be what she can be. And she might
just end up being the person who saves the planet for our
grandchildren.
 
– Chris Anderson, TED Curator
 
http://tedchris.posterous.com/

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Ch940127

the current state of our school systems

Rules

Rules